Inside my screenshot - combat as mobs start to spawn


  • Traverse Team

    Recorded some gameplay as ' Knight ' class. I was making a screenshot for twitter and decided to record the scene as a few mobs started spawning.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AW_7DtRM588



  • I love the art/animation style. Is that something already in Unity, or did you make it?


  • Traverse Team

    We are making the game in Unreal Engine; inspired by lowpoly art around the net...



  • Sorry, I meant Unreal Engine.
    I understand that it's not a completely unique art style, I was wondering if it was something found in the engine already or in an add on or something, or if the two of you had to develop it yourselves? I'm just curious as to how much work it was to get the water to look like that, just "INCLUDE: water;" and drop it in place, or defining it's surface, reflections, motion, etc. in a library/class?


  • Traverse Team

    @EternalSites said:

    I'm just curious as to how much work it was to get the water to look like that, just "INCLUDE: water;" and drop it in place, or defining it's surface, reflections, motion, etc. in a library/class?

    Thanks for clarifying!! There is a number of aspects of our game that use Unreal Engine features -- like the way collisions are handled, or the way sounds are played; system that drives character/mob animations; a lot of networking, etc.

    A lot of the world components, we had to write ourselves, because engine doesn't have it built in. Data for terrain, water and ocean is voxels, and these are converted to mesh when rendered. The whole system for voxel handling, and to make it network-friendly was custom made by us.

    For ocean in particular, we wanted to make it interactive. In most games, ocean is made up as one large plane that cuts through the whole scene. This plane is made up of a number of vertices, and vertices are animated in the shader (so video card moves them, to create effect of waves). Underwater effects are added separately, as a 'post process'.

    Our ocean surface actually detects where coastline is, and adapts itself when a player changes water level for their planet. It also doesn't leek or cut through the whole world on that level. Players can dig dungeons that are physically below ocean level, or under ocean floor. If they puncture the wall -- water will flood. Those elements and systems, we had to build ourselves.

    For the overall look; the low poly style, we have to customize Unreal's shaders that are built for next gen rendering; Today's video cards are actually not friendly towards 'low poly edged look'. In most case we used Unreal's material editor (visual interface to shader definition) to achieve the look, but for several effects we had to change the actual HLSL code. In particular, we want one triangle to be shaded with one color, without any gradients; but we also don't want to have to 'split vertices' to achieve that.

    Having done all that, we still mix the output with other advanced features Unreal can do for us. For instance, players, on their planet, can change the color of the tree. But not just the color; they can make trunk look metallic and branches glassy. For characters, similarly, you have large freedom during character creation; later in game, you can paint your armor whatever color, however areas that share colors are predefined.

    Cheers,
    Xulture



  • Wow. Just, wow. That's an impressive amount of detail for any team, let alone two people. I can't wait to see how it works in-game!

    Thanks for the explanation!


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